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Advanced Placement Summer Institute: A Survey of Florida AP Teachers

Publication Information
Date: 
2009-04-30
Kelly E. Godfrey
Abstract: 

Advanced Placement Program Summer Institute (APSI) courses provide teachers with an overview of the curriculum, structure, and content of specific AP courses. Attention is devoted not only to the development of curriculum but also to teaching strategies and the relationship of the course to the AP Examination. During the summers of 2006 and 2007, 168 institutes were held for new and experienced AP teachers in the state of Florida at nine institutions of higher education; in 2006, 79 were held; and there were 89 held in 2007.  In the spring of 2008, evaluation researchers at the College Board developed a survey to solicit feedback on participants' impressions of the APSIs offered in Florida, as well as changes they made on their AP curriculum and exam preparation as a direct result of attending the institute(s).

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A Comparison of College Performances of AP and Non-AP Student Groups in 10 Subject Areas

Publication Information
Date: 
2008-12-31
Leslie Keng
Barbara G. Dodd
Abstract: 

This study sought to compare the peformance of students in the College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) compared to non-AP students on a number of college outcome measures.  Ten individual AP Exams were examined in this study of students in four entering classes (1998-2001) at the University of Texas at Austin.  The study's results support previous research that AP students performed as well if not better than non-AP students on most college outcome measures.

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Stereotype Threat Spillover and SAT Scores

Publication Information
Date: 
2008-12-31
Michael E. Walker
Brent Bridgeman
Abstract: 

A recent study by Beilock, Reidell, and McConnell (2007) suggested that stereotype threat experienced in one domain (e.g., math) triggered by knowledge of a negative stereotype about a social group in that particular domain can spill over into subsequent tasks in totally unrelated domains (e.g., reading).  The authors suggested that these findings might have implications for how the ordering of sections on standardized tests such as the SAT or GRE could affect examinee performance.  To test the authors' assertions, this study used data from a recent SAT administration in which either a reading, a math, or a writing task preceded a reading task.  Performance on the subsequent reading task of members of a stereotype threatened group (i.e., women) who took the math task first was compared to performance of those who took the reading or writing task first.  Results were inconsistent with the stereotype threat spillover hypothesis, and serve to justify the exhortation of Cullen, Hardison, and Sackett (2004) for caution in generalizing lab findings on stereotype threat to operational testing situations.

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Testing Accommodations for English Language Learners: A Review of State and District Policies

Publication Information
Date: 
2008-10-27
John W. Young
Teresa King
Abstract: 

This report is a review and summary of current information regarding test accommodations currently used in different states and districts for English language learners (ELL).  Similarities and differences among states regarding ELL accommodation are documented.

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Differential Validity and Prediction of the SAT

Publication Information
Date: 
2008-10-17
Krista D. Mattern
Brian F. Patterson
Jennifer L. Kobrin
Sandra M. Barbuti
Abstract: 

The purpose of the study is to examine the differential validity and prediction of the SAT using a nationally representative sample of first-year college students admitted with the revised version of the SAT.  The findings demonstrate that there are similar patterns of differential validity and prediction by gender, race/ethnicity, and best language subgroups on the revised SAT compared with previous research on older versions of the test.

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Validity of the SAT for Predicting First-Year College Grade Point Average

Publication Information
Date: 
2008-10-17
Jennifer L. Kobrin
Brian F. Patterson
Krista D. Mattern
Sandra M. Barbuti
Abstract: 

This report presents the results of a large-scale national validity study of the SAT.  The results show that the changes made to the SAT did not substantially change how well the test predicts first-year college performance.  Across all institutions, the recently added writing section is the most highly predictive of the three individual SAT sections.  As expected, the best combination of predictors of first-year college grade point average is high school grade point average and SAT scores.

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College Outcomes Comparisons by AP and Non-AP High School Experiences

Publication Information
Date: 
2008-10-17
Linda Hargrove
Donn Godin
Barbara G. Dodd
Abstract: 

Performance was examined for five cohorts of 1998-2002 Texas public high school graduates through their first year and 1998-2001 cohorts through their fourth year of Texas public higher education.  Student performance on college outcomes included (a) first- and fourth-year grade point averages, (b) first- and fourth-year credit hours earned, and (c) four-year graduation status.  Outcomes were compared across students who varied by three types of AP (course only, exam only, and both course and exam) and two types of non-AP (dual enrollment only and other course only) experiences in high school.

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The Relationship of AP Teacher Practices and Student AP Exam Performance

Publication Information
Date: 
2007-12-31
Pamela L. Paek
Henry Braun
Catherine Trapani
Eva Ponte
Donald E. Powers
Abstract: 

This report analyzes the relationship of AP teacher practices and student performance on AP Biology and AP U.S. History Exams.

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Monitoring Reader Performance and DRIFT in the AP English Literature and Composition Examination Using Benchmark Essays

Publication Information
Date: 
2007-12-31
Edward Wolfe
Carol M. Myford
George Engelhard, Jr.
Jonathan R. Manalo
Abstract: 

This study investigated a variety of reader effects that may influence the validity of ratings assigned to AP English Literature and Composition essays.  Specifically, researchers investigated whether readers exhibit changes in their levels of severity and accuracy, and their use of individual scale categories over time.

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Examination of Fatigue Effects from Extended-Time Accommodations on the SAT Reasoning Test

Publication Information
Date: 
2007-12-21
Cara Cahalan-Laitusis
Deanna L. Morgan
Brent Bridgeman
Jennifer Zanna
Elizabeth Stone
Abstract: 

This study examined operational data from the SAT Reasoning Test to determine if students who tested under extended-time conditions were suffering from excessive fatigue relative to students who tested under standard-time conditions.  Results indicated few changes in levels of DIF (early in the test compared to late in the test).  In addition, item completion rates for students who received extra time were comparable to (or in some cases higher than) test-takers without disabilities who tested under standard time on both early and late sections.

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