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Florida SpringBoard® Schools Efficacy Study

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Date: 
2015-08-11
Sunny X. Niu
Jun Li
Jennifer Merriman
Haifa Matos-Elefonte
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Florida SpringBoard® Schools Efficacy Study
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In this study, we compare Spring Board® (SB) schools that had continuously used the SB English Language Arts (ELA) curriculum for at least three years with comparable non-SB schools. For high schools, the outcomes examined were school-level AP® participation and performance for a) all AP subjects, b) ELA and social science AP subjects, and c) ELA only subjects. AP performance was defined as the percentage of students among graduating seniors scoring 3 or higher in at least one AP Exam. We report comparison results for all students in schools, and for three subgroups — black, Hispanic, and first-generation college-going students. For middle schools, the outcome examined was school-level FCAT reading scores among eighth-graders.

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Supply and Demand in the Higher Education Market: College Enrollment

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Date: 
2015-08-04
Michael Hurwitz
Amal Kumar
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Supply and Demand in the Higher Education Market: College Enrollment
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Between 2002 and 2012, the number of Hispanic/Latino first-time, degree-seeking students across all sectors doubled from 236,000 to 475,000. In 2002, these students comprised 10% of all first-time, degree-seeking students, and by 2012 their share had increased to 16%.

In 2008, the number of Hispanic/Latino high school graduates exceeded the number of black/African American high school graduates for the first time. However, it was not until 2011 that the number of first-time, degree-seekingHispanic/Latino postsecondary students outnumberedblack/African American students.

Between 2002 and 2012, the number of black/African American first-time, degree-seeking students at for-profit colleges and universities quadrupled, peaking in 2010 before declining slightly over the past few years.

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Supply and Demand in the Higher Education Market: College Admission and College Choice

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Date: 
2015-08-04
Michael Hurwitz
Amal Kumar
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Supply and Demand in the Higher Education Market: College Admission and College Choice
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Over the decade spanning 2002 through 2012, college applicationvolume increased across thecollege selectivity spectrum. In fact, over this period, the Most Competitive colleges (Barron’scategory 1) and the colleges classified by Barron’s as Competitive (Barron’s category 4) both experienced an 81% increase in first-time, first-year, degree-seeking applications.

The admission rates decreased in all Barron’s competitiveness categories between 2002 and 2012. The steepest decrease was found among the Most Competitive colleges, where the admission rate decreased from 31% to 22%.

The yield rate decreased between 2002 and 2012. Less selective colleges tended to experience sharper dips in yieldover this period than did moreselective colleges. The yield rate fell from 52% in 2002 to 34% in 2012 at colleges in the Less Competitive Barron’s category.

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An SAT Validity Primer

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Date: 
2015-02-20
Emily J. Shaw
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An SAT Validity Primer
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This primer should provide the reader with a deeper understanding of the concept of test validity and will present the recent available validity evidence on the relationship bewtween SAT® scores and important college outcomes. 

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Incorporating Ninth-Grade PSAT/NMSQT Scores into AP Potential Predictions for AP European History and AP World History

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Historically, AP Potential™ correlations and expectancy tables have been based on 10th-and 11th-grade PSAT/NMSQT® examinees and 11th-and 12th-grade AP® examinees for all subjects (Zhang, Patel, & Ewing,2014; Ewing, Camara, & Millsap, 2006; Camara & Millsap, 1998). However, a large number of students take AP European History and AP World History Exams in 10th grade. The purpose of this addendum is to provide updated correlations and expectancy tables for AP European History and AP World History Exam scores that incorporate into the analyses students who took the PSAT/NMSQT in ninth grade and the AP Exam in 10th grade along with the other grade levels that have always formed the basis for the AP Potential predictions.

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Nine Facts About the SAT That Might Surprise You

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Date: 
2014-12-18
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Lynn Letukas
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Nine Facts About the SAT That Might Surprise You
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The purpose of this document is to identify and dispel rumors that are frequently cited about the SAT. The following is a compilation of nine popular rumors organized into three areas: Student Demographics, Test Preparation/Test Prediction, and Test Utilization.

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A Review of the Role of College Counseling, Coaching, and Mentoring on Students’ Postsecondary Outcomes

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Date: 
2014-11-26
Christopher Avery
Jessica Howell
Lindsay Page
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  • Students from lower-income families have the greatest need for college counseling, yet have the least access to counselors.
  • Inadequate school finances, insufficient counselor training programs, and a lack of clarity about how school counselors should allocate their time generate barriers to effective college counseling.
  • A substantial number of novel counseling, coaching, and mentoring programs demonstrate effectiveness at increasing FAFSA completion, college application, college.
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A Review of the Role of College Applications on Students’ Postsecondary Outcomes

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Date: 
2014-11-26
Christopher Avery
Jessica Howell
Lindsay Page
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  • Students tend to submit too few college applications and do notapply to enough “reach” and“match” colleges.
  • The application barriers they face may be procedural,geographical, cultural,informational, or financial.
  • Potential solutions to reduce and remove these barriers includeprograms that substantially alterthe usual application processes,provide information about andsupport outreach by colleges,promote the use of collegeapplication fee waivers, andimprove college counseling.
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College Completion: Comparing AP®, Dual-Enrolled, and Nonadvanced Students

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Date: 
2014-10-03
Kelly E. Godfrey
Haifa Matos-Elefonte
Maureen Ewing
Priyank Patel
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The study presented here is an investigation and comparison of the relationships between the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) and dual-enrolled high school courses and college outcomes. Previous research provides evidence that participation in AP, and subsequent success on AP Exams, is positively related to various college outcomes including an increased likelihood of graduating from college and better preparation for the academic rigor of the college classroom. This study aims to contribute to the understanding of the value of advanced course work in high school in preparing students for higher education success by investigating the relationships between participation and performance in AP courses and exams, dual enrollment courses, and regular courses and four different college outcomes including first-year subject-specific GPA, final subject-specific GPA, calendar time to bachelor’s degree, and credit hours attempted. Results indicated that higher performance on AP Exams was related to higher college performance in the subject area, as well as fewer credit hours taken to bachelor’s degree. Most dual enrollment course grades were at a C or higher, and students taking these courses tended to graduate from college in fewer calendar terms than other groups.

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The Benefits of Early Engagement in the College-Preparation Process: Implications for Practitioners

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Date: 
2014-10-03
Jeffrey N. Wyatt
Kara Smith
Nina Proestler
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The ability of the United States to remain competitive in the expanding global economy will require a more knowledgeable and skilled workforce than ever before. Most of the jobs in the fastest-growing industries will require individuals with some postsecondary education. As such, there is a need to engage students in an effective college- and career-preparation process early to increase their likelihood of readiness and success in college and careers. A system that allows students to exhibit their knowledge, skills, and abilities as they relate to college and career readiness and monitor whether they are on target and stay on target for postsecondary success is an integral component of this process. The College Board offers a set of psychometrically sound assessments called the Pathway that provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate whether they are successfully engaging in the college-preparation process. ReadiStep™, the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT®), the SAT®, and their associated tools, also create a trajectory that assists students with getting and staying on target for success in college and careers. Using the College Board Pathway, the research presented in this report examines the relationship between student engagement in the college-preparation process and success in postsecondary outcomes for a sample of students who graduated from high school in 2006. Results from analyses of these data indicated that:

• Students who entered the College Board Pathway and exhibited being on target to college and career readiness earlier tended to have higher rates of postsecondary success in terms of four-year college enrollment, retention, and graduation.

• Students who exhibited being on target for college and career readiness early in high school and continuously monitored their readiness throughout the Pathway system tended to have higher rates of postsecondary success than students who did not continue in the Pathway sequence.

• The postsecondary benefits of entering the Pathway in 10th grade, and getting and staying on target to college and career readiness early accrue to all students, regardless of race or ethnicity.

Engagement in the college-preparation process is an important component in a student’s college and career readiness. In addition, getting on target early and staying on target is positively related to a student’s likelihood of succeeding in postsecondary education. This is meaningful, given the importance of students acquiring the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to achieve postsecondary success and engage in careers that will support the nation’s competitiveness in the growing global economy.

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